Articles

Emergency Situations

  • In the wild, a bird will endeavor to uphold a strong appearance when sick. This is called, “survival of the fittest”. By the time a bird actually shows an owner that it is unwell, it has likely been sick for some time.

  • Birds are very good at hiding illness. Tests are used in conjunction with the findings of a physical examination and presenting history in order to diagnose an illness.

  • A biopsy is one of the more common diagnostic procedures performed in cats and people. Skin biopsies provide valuable insight into the type of cells contained in an abnormal area of skin or a skin growth, and whether the lesion poses a more serious health threat to your pet.

  • There are approximately three thousand species of snakes in the world with less than five hundred venomous species. Rattlesnakes account for most venomous snakebites and for almost all deaths. The clinical signs associated with a venomous snakebite vary based on the species of snake.

  • Summer is a great time to get outdoors and enjoy nature and the warm sunshine, especially with your pet. Pets are inquisitive creatures and love to investigate their surroundings. Unfortunately, this trait can lead pets down the path of injury and illness. The following information will help you to avoid many summer dangers that can affect your pet.

  • Few events are more frightening for a pet parent than a surgery. Although surgery may sometimes be unavoidable, fortunately our understanding of pet pain - how it occurs, how it affects all body systems, how to prevent it, and how to treat it - has improved dramatically over the past 5 to 10 years.

  • Syncope (or fainting) is defined as a temporary loss of consciousness that occurs when the brain does not receive enough oxygen. Most dogs who experience syncope spontaneously recover once appropriate levels of oxygen reach the brain.

  • The tail is an important part of the canine anatomy and is actually an extension of the spine. This complex tail structure of bone, muscles, nerves, and blood vessels can easily be injured.

  • The uvea is the part of the eye made up of the iris, the ciliary body and the choroid. The choroid is the middle layer or vascular tunic of the eye located between the sclera, which is the fibrous protective outer coat (the white of the eye) and the retina, which is the light sensitive surface within the eye.

  • Vitamin D poisoning occurs when a cat ingests a toxic dose of vitamin D. A common source of vitamin D poisoning is when a cat accidentally ingests rodenticides containing vitamin D. Vitamin D poisoning causes a variety of clinical signs. The initial clinical signs, occurring anywhere from 8 to 48 hours after ingestion, include depression, weakness, and appetite loss. Vomiting, increased drinking and urination, constipation, and dehydration typically follow these signs.