Articles

Infectious Diseases

  • Feline chlamydial conjunctivitis, or chlamydophila (previously known as feline pneumonitis) is an infection caused by a bacterial organism called Chlamydophila felis. Although the term pneumonitis implies inflammation of the lungs, the most common signs of infection involve the eyes or the upper respiratory tract (nose or throat), and only when infection is not treated does it spread to the lungs.

  • Chlamydophilosis, also called "psittacosis", “chlamydiosis” or "Parrot Fever", is a reasonably common disease of birds. It can occur in any bird but is especially common in cockatiels, Amazon parrots and budgerigars (often referred to incorrectly as parakeets.)

  • When clinical signs of upper respiratory tract inflammation, such as sneezing or nasal and eye discharge, persist over weeks or months, or when they tend to recur at intervals of a few weeks, the condition is referred to as chronic upper respiratory tract disease. A runny or stuffed-up nose is the most common clinical sign in cats with chronic infections. There are many causes of this relatively common problem in cats. The treatment will be determined by the test results and diagnosis.

  • Coccidiosis is an intestinal tract infection caused by a one-celled organism or protozoa called coccidia. Coccidia are microscopic parasites that live within cells of the intestinal lining. Kittens are commonly diagnosed with coccidiosis. The most common drug used to treat coccidiosis is a sulfa-class antibiotic, sulfadimethoxine.

  • Coccidiosis is an intestinal tract infection caused by a single-celled organism (protozoa) called coccidia. Most infections in dogs are not associated with any detectable clinical signs. Most cases of coccidiosis are self-limiting and require little medical intervention. The most common drug used to eliminate coccidia is a sulfa-type antibiotic, sulfadimethoxine.

  • Conjunctivitis is the medical term used to describe inflammation of the tissues surrounding the eye. Feline herpesvirus conjunctivitis a form of primary conjunctivitis caused by the highly infectious feline herpesvirus (FHV-1).

  • Coronavirus disease is an intestinal infection in dogs that is usually short-lived, but may cause considerable abdominal discomfort for a few days. The cause is a virus of the Coronavirus family.

  • Crop infections are common in pet birds, especially baby birds that are being hand fed. While not usually fatal if treated early, crop infections can be serious and result in a complete loss of appetite.

  • Cytauxzoonosis is often fatal disease spread to cats by the Lone Star tick. The disease can progress rapidly and treatments are only moderately effective. Tick control and use of preventives is the best method to prevent this disease from developing in cats.

  • Diskospondylitis involves infection and inflammation of the disks between the vertebrae in the spine. The most common first clinical signs are difficulty getting up from a down position, reluctance to jump, and an abnormal, unstable gait, including lameness.